DOI: 10.24075/brsmu.2018.080

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Lipidoid iron oxide nanoparticles are a platform for nucleic acid delivery to the liver

About authors

1 Laboratory of Biomedical Nanomaterials, National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow

2 Center of Life Science, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow

3 Laboratory of Tissue Specific Ligands Investigation, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow

4 Department of Physical Materials Science, National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow

5 Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Moscow

Correspondence should be addressed: Victoria I. Uvarova
Leninsky 4, Moscow, 119049; ur.kb@ayirotkiv_avoravu

About paper

Funding: the study was funded by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation. Project 14.578.21.0201 (ID RFMEFI57816X0201).

Received: 2018-06-26 Accepted: 2018-08-25 Published online: 30.12.2018
|
Fig. 1. A TEM image and a size distribution histogram of the magnetite nanoparticles: size range of 10 to 20 nm (A); size range of 20 to 30 nm (B)
Fig. 2. Physical and chemical properties of nanocubes: X-ray diffraction analysis (A); hysteresis loops (B); TGA/DSC (C)
Fig. 3. A. Hydrodynamic size of uncoated nanocubes in chloroform. B. Hydrodynamic size of lipid-coated nanoclusters in water
Fig. 4. Cytotoxicity of different concentrations of lipidoid-coated CbS and CbB nanoclusters with magnetic core against HepG2 (A) and Huh7 (B) cell lines
Fig. 5. Distribution of magnetic core CbS and CbB nanoclusters in the liver and spleen visualized by MRI (A); in all studied internal organs measured by AES (B)
Fig. 6. Distribution of magnetic core CbS and CbB nanoclusters in liver cells (Perls reaction)